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Ayman's blog

Examination of 1,000-Year-Old Viking ‘Death House’ Reveals Elite Burial with Stunning Artifacts

A team of researchers have examined a rare Viking tomb known as a ‘death house’, revealing an elite burial containing the remains of two noblemen and a woman, along with impressive artifacts including a large battle axe.

The initial discovery of the grave took place in south west Denmark in 2012, during construction work to create a new highway. The burial was identified as a rare Viking tomb known as a ‘d`ødehus’`, meaning ``death house``. Since the beginning, it has been obvious that the tomb belonged to a highly distinguished person or people.

The tomb measures 4m by 13m and contained three burials dating back to 950 AD. Unfortunately, the soil conditions at the site affected the preservation of the human remains. However, an analysis of the burial finds allowed the researchers to confirm that it is a grave of two men and a woman. According to excavation leader Kirsten Nelleman Nielsen, who described the finding in an article called `Dead and buried in the Viking Age` published by Saxo Institute at the University of Copenhagen, it seems that one man and a woman were buried together in the main part of the tomb, while another man was buried in the back. The third grave in the tomb had been added later.

Sketch of the tomb layout. On the left, is a room with two graves belonging to a man and a woman. On the right, is an additional grave for a man that was added later

Sketch of the tomb layout. On the left, is a room with two graves belonging to a man and a woman. On the right, is an additional grave for a man that was added later. (Illustration: Museum Silkeborg)

Photo: Belal Wagdy

Photo: Belal Wagdy

High school students gathered in downtown Cairo on Wednesday to stage fresh protests against the postponement of the public high school (Thanaweyya Amma) exams.

According to privately-owned Al-Bedaiah, security forces dispersed the protest, leading the students to move to the steps of the Press Syndicate, a popular location for protests. according to eyewitness reports.

Dozens of students had also gathered for protests on Monday against the decision to postpone the Thanaweyya Amma exams after several of the exam papers and model answers were leaked online. The students are also calling for the resignation of education minister Al-Helali Al-Sherbini.

Facebook page “Shawming’s Cheats for High School Exams” had posted the questions and model answers of the Arabic language exam 20 minutes into the start of the test. The questions and model answers for the religion examination were also posted before the exam began, leading the Ministry of Education to cancel it.

Members of the Egyptian parliament held the Minister of Education Al Helali Al Sherbini responsible for the leak incident in a hearing following the exam leak. They called for summoning and questioning the minister, while some deputies demanded his resignation.

 

The arrival hall is empty at the Sharm el-Sheikh Airport in south Sinai, Egypt, Monday. Airbus executives say they are confident in the safety of the A321 that crashed Oct. 31 in Egypt`s Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people on board. Photo: AP

The arrival hall is empty at the Sharm el-Sheikh Airport in south Sinai, Egypt, Monday. Airbus executives say they are confident in the safety of the A321 that crashed Oct. 31 in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people on board. Photo: AP

Egypt’s Minister of Civil Aviation Sherif Fathy welcomed a recent decision to lift the Sinai Peninsula from worldwide no-fly zones.

According to state-media Al-Ahram, the International Civil Aviation Organization lifted the Sinai from the Notice to Airmen warnings, which warns airliners and pilots of hazards and safety issues from flying over an area.

The decision may mean the return of airplanes flying over the Sinai Peninsula, as opposed to looping around most parts of it.

Large airliners have stayed away from the Sinai since the crash of a Russian airplane in October 2014, which killed all 224 passengers on board. Terrorism, according to numerous security officials and Egypt’s President Sisi, resulted in the crash which has severely impacted Egypt’s tourism industry.

Egypt’s North Sinai fell into chaos and violence following the ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi in July 2013. The majority of deaths from terror attacks have occurred in North Sinai, with military operations killing more than 200 suspected terrorists in the first few months of 2016.

Refugees arrive at the train station in Saalfeld, central Germany, Saturday, Sept. 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)

Refugees arrive at the train station in Saalfeld, central Germany, Saturday, Sept. 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)

A 25-year-old Syrian refugee living in Minden, Germany has been hailed as a “hero” for turning €150,000 to authorities.

The Syrian man found the money in a cupboard that had been given to him by a charitable organization. After discovering that the huge amount, which was hidden in the cupboard, was actually real money, he reported the discovery to police.

“This young man has behaved in an exemplary manner and deserves great credit. People often report small amounts of money found to the police, but such a large sum is absolutely exceptional,” said the police in a statement published online.

The Syrian arrived in Germany in October 2015 as a refugee and is currently living in Minden where he is learning German and is hoping to enroll in further education.

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Three years into his imprisonment, Egyptian photojournalist Mahmoud Abou Zeid “Shawkan” received the 2016 John Aubuchon Press Freedom Award.

The National Press Club also granted the award to American student Tim Tai. Speaking about the winners, the club’s President Thomas Burr said that they “remind us of the courage and perseverance that undergird excellent reporting and that keep us fighting for press freedom.”

Shawkan was arrested on assignment on August 14 2013, when security forces violently dispersed a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi. After being held in pre-trial detention for more than two years – despite the maximum period for pre-trial detention being two years – he stood in front of court in December.

“[Shawkan] has been accused of several crimes the Club considers to be trumped up,” Burr stated.

The Egyptian photojournalist is accused of possessing weapons, attempted murder, illegal assembly and terrorizing citizens. Among the 740 defendants in the case are Supreme Guide Mohamed Badie and other prominent Muslim Brotherhood figures, in addition to several individuals who were rounded up from and around the sit-in area.
“Shawkan’s case exemplifies the draconian way Egyptian authorities have cracked down on the press,” Burr said, adding, “Egypt is one of the world’s top jailers of news professionals, and the situation there is not improving.”

The photojournalist’s trial is scheduled for August 9 after having been adjourned again on Tuesday.

In prison, Shawkan contracted Hepatitis C. Malnourishment, confinement and hunger strikes have left him anemic and he is suffering from depression, while reportedly being denied medical access.

A number of local and international organizations, including Amnesty International, have decried Shawkan’s imprisonment multiple times calling for his immediate release.

Ancient Deep Skull Still Holds Big Surprises 60 Years After it was Unearthed

Thousands of years ago, the ancestors of modern humans left Africa to embark on a journey that would eventually take them across the globe. Yet we still know precious little about the momentous journeys they undertook.

Now, new research by my team and me significantly recasts how we think about the early peopling of Southeast Asia and the relationship the earliest humans had to the indigenous people of the region today.

Southeast Asia spans some 4.5 million square kilometres and is today home to roughly one tenth of the world’s population. Yet, we still know very little about their origins beyond a few thousand years ago.

This region’s ancient past has much wider importance; the early peopling of New Guinea, Australia and ultimately, the Pacific, was launched from Southeast Asia.

Yet archaeologists have found only six sets of remains dating beyond 25,000 years ago from across the region. This is the closest we’ve come to having skeletons of the first modern humans themselves.

They were scattered far and wide: found at Wadjak in Indonesia, Niah Cave in Malaysian Borneo, Callao Cave and Tabon Cave in the Philippines, Tam Pa Ling in Laos and Moh Khiew Cave in Thailand.

Strikingly, the Wadjak remains were found in 1888-90, and the Tam Pa Ling bones only uncovered in 2010. This gives a sense of just how rare and valuable early human remains are and how infrequently such discoveries are made.

First glimpses of the Deep Skull

It brings me to the famous Deep Skull, which was found by Tom Harrisson and his team almost 60 years ago in Niah Cave in Sarawak. This fossil was the focus research we published today in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

Surprising Hints of Possible Portal to Pan Found Near Ancient City in Israel

A team of archaeologists working in Hippos-Sussita, Israel have uncovered what may be a gateway to a worship compound for the Greek God Pan. This possibility is exciting as few built structures or temples have been found to date connected with worship of this god. Most researchers have said linked him to caves and other natural locations outside cities. This discovery also helps shed some light on a mysterious mask previously unearthed at the site.

Live Science reports that a team of researchers from the Zinman Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa have “uncovered a monumental Roman gate, which may have led to a compound dedicated to the worship of Pan.”

The team and the gate they have excavated.

The team and the gate they have excavated. (Dr. Michael Eisenberg/University of Haifa)

The researchers believe that the gate, which is located outside the city limits, may have measured 20 feet (6 meters) tall. The two square basalt towers have been estimated to have dimensions of approximately 6.30 meters by 6.30 meters (20.67 by 20.67 ft.) and have a portal that is 3.7 meters (12.14 ft.) wide. The researchers date the structure to the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD, or a little earlier.

Paramedics push a stretcher at Turkey`s largest airport, Istanbul Ataturk, Turkey, following a blast June 28, 2016. (Osman Orsal / Reuters)

Paramedics push a stretcher at Turkey’s largest airport, Istanbul Ataturk, Turkey, following a blast June 28, 2016. (Osman Orsal / Reuters)

As many as 50 people were killed and 60 more injured, with six of them in critical condition, in a gun and suicide bomb attack on Istanbul Ataturk Airport in Turkey on Tuesday, the Associated Press quoted a senior Turkish official as saying.

While AFP is reporting that two explosions rocked the airport, Turkish news agency TRT quoted governor Sahin as saying there were a total of three explosions carried out by three attackers. Turkey’s justice minister also said that one of the attackers opened fire with a Kalashnikov before detonating his bomb.

Police opened fire on the attackers in an attempt to stop them before reaching a security checkpoint at the arrivals hall of the airport but the attackers blew themselves up, Reuters quoted Turkish officials as saying.

The suicide bombers all died in the attack but it remains unclear whether they are included in the death toll.

There has been no immediate claim of responsibility; however, Turkish media is reporting that police believe the Islamic State is behind the attack.

All flights leaving from and arriving at the airport have been suspended.

Tuesday’s bombing is the latest in a series of attacks in Turkey. In January, a large explosion rocked the Sultanahmet Square in central Istanbul. The following month, 28 people were killed and another 61 were injured in a car explosion targeting a convoy of military vehicles in the Turkish capital city of Ankara. In March, another explosion near a bus stop in Ankara claimed 37 lives, with a Kurdish militant group claiming responsibility for the attack.

In October 2015, two large explosions in Ankara killed at least 30 people and injured dozens. The blasts targeted a peace rally that was calling for an end to violence between Turkish forces and the PKK, the Kurdish separatist group.

This story is developing.

People stand outside the entrance as they leave the airport after two explosions followed by gunfire hit the Turkey`s biggest airport of Ataturk in Istanbul, on June 28, 2016 (AFP Photo/Ozan Kose)

People stand outside the entrance as they leave the airport after two explosions followed by gunfire hit the Turkey’s biggest airport of Ataturk in Istanbul, on June 28, 2016 (AFP Photo/Ozan Kose)

At least 28 people were killed and 60 more injured, with six of them in critical condition, in a gun and suicide bomb attack on Istanbul Ataturk Airport in Turkey on Tuesday, according to Istanbul’s governor Vasip Sahin.

While AFP is reporting that two explosions rocked the airport, Turkish news agency TRT quoted governor Sahin as saying there were a total of three explosions carried out by three attackers. Turkey’s justice minister also said that one of the attackers opened fire with a Kalashnikov before detonating his bomb.

Police opened fire on the attackers in an attempt to stop them before reaching a security checkpoint at the arrivals hall of the airport but the attackers blew themselves up, Reuters quoted Turkish officials as saying.

The suicide bombers all died in the attack but it remains unclear whether they are included in the death toll.

There has been no immediate claim of responsibility; however, Turkish media is reporting that police believe the Islamic State is behind the attack.

All flights leaving from and arriving at the airport have been suspended.

Tuesday’s bombing is the latest in a series of attacks in Turkey. In January, a large explosion rocked the Sultanahmet Square in central Istanbul. The following month, 28 people were killed and another 61 were injured in a car explosion targeting a convoy of military vehicles in the Turkish capital city of Ankara. In March, another explosion near a bus stop in Ankara claimed 37 lives, with a Kurdish militant group claiming responsibility for the attack.

In October 2015, two large explosions in Ankara killed at least 30 people and injured dozens. The blasts targeted a peace rally that was calling for an end to violence between Turkish forces and the PKK, the Kurdish separatist group.

This story is developing.

Medieval Weapon-Making Foundry Discovered on Shore of Lake Baikal

Furnaces for advanced metal production have been found under a dirt track used by summer tourists. Archaeologists walking to a beauty spot on Lake Baikal chanced across the unique ancient furnaces after noticing slag and clay coating on a rough road used by tourists to access the shoreline. 

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It’s 8 pm and 26-year-old Mai Ahmed is immersed in preparing jars of Konafa with chocolate for her clients.

Mai, who runs her own dessert business from home, found that she has a golden opportunity to boost her business during the busy month of Ramadan by managing to meet clients’ demands on time and maintaining a high level of quality.

Ramadan in Egypt is known to be a time for Egyptians to opt out of their daily routines and spend more time with family members and loved ones to break bread together over iftar. After iftar, the sunset meal with which Muslims break their fast, families often perform the taraweeh prayer and then gather to indulge in some Ramadan desserts.

“The orders are tremendously increasing during Ramadan, the demand on desserts such as Konafa and Qatayef is high as it is a known tradition Muslims used to have after they break their fast,” the owner of the startup “Moly Bakes” told Egyptian Streets.

Konafa and Qatayef are comprised of Levantine pastries soaked in a sweet, sugar-based syrup, typical of the regions belonging to the former Ottoman Empire.

The business of homemade meals and desserts does not exclusively attract individuals who are unemployed or lacking a solid education. Many youths who are no longer interested in governmental jobs or working in the private sector have discovered their entrepreneurial spirits turned to home-based food businesses.

It is also no longer a necessity that startups offering homemade food be run by women, but for Waleed Abdul Rahman, an entrepreneur and the brains behind Mumm, enabling home-based women to start their own businesses is an effective way to empower more women.

“What we do is that we enable home-based cooks with the right tools to create sustainable job opportunities for themselves from their homes. The start-up ensures they are equipped with the right tools to deliver quality tasty food, for the consumer,” Abdul Rahman said.

Meanwhile, the idea of establishing a homemade food business has boomed in Egyptian society, particularly as a large percentage of the working force is comprised by women, whose time is often constrained as they juggle their personal and professional lives, as well as their household obligations.

For newlywed Amira Ahmed, turning to a homemade food delivery service is an easy solution – particularly during Ramadan – as she finds difficulty in making food at home while also tending to her new baby and keeping up with her work.

Mumm founder Abdul Rahman said that this demand is evident during Ramadan, when the entire staff is fully booked with delivery orders. He says that it is challenging to strike a balance between the month’s spiritual and social demands while also taking advantage of the high demand on his business to boost revenues.

“I work in Ramadan around 12 hours which is a set back from the normal day so I try to be courteous in social gathering yet limit my socialization time,” Abdul Rahman.

Many business owners of such startups begin their day early in the morning and continue dedicating their time to their business until late in the afternoon, only to resume work after breaking their fast to keep up with customers’ demands.

While the peak in demand means good business for homemade food startups, Amal Khalil decided to circumvent the extra pressure of delivering warm food in time for iftar and peak hours during the remainder of the year by launching a business that also offers frozen meals.

Khalil said that she tries to ensure the high quality of her food while maintaining competitive prices to attract more clients to her business, FroGoodies.

“It all started when I thought of sharing the warmth of home-cooked quality food with individuals living on their own, particularly in Ramadan as a way to compensate for the absence of their families,” the owner of the home-made food start-up said.

The name of FroGoodies refers to two things: Frozen to be at your convenience any time of the day and any day of the week, and goodies from different parts of the world to satisfy eager eaters’ taste-buds, Khalil says.

“Going out in Ramadan is mostly a hassle I don’t like to handle, particularly through this month which is dedicated to prayers and worship. As for gatherings, we usually opt to host them, so it’s another chance to showcase our goodies!” she added.

egyptian women

An Egyptian initiative working to end social acceptability of sexual harassment launched a campaign on Monday encouraging women to inquire about a workplace’s internal policies prior to accepting a job.

In a statement on Monday, the campaign said it aims to eliminate sexual harassment in workplaces through raising women’s awareness about their rights.

The Egyptian initiative HarassMap, launched in 2010, highlighted the importance for women to understand the internal policies in workplaces before accepting a job offer, saying that women should make sure that work internal policies include clear penalties to confront sexual harassment in workplaces.

A study by the Egyptian Labor Union in 2014 showed that 30 percent of women in Egypt are subjected to verbal harassment in the workplace.

HarassMap communication director Aliya Soliman told Aswat Masriya that the campaign is part of a larger one that started in 2015 under the slogan “Safe Corporates.” The campaign aims “to transform workplaces in Egypt into zero tolerance to sexual harassment.”

HarassMap also partnered with app-based car service Uber to give trainings to Uber drivers on the different types of sexual harassment and how to confront harassment.

Soliman said the campaign aims to change society’s idea on harassment which places the blame on women.

A study by UN Women in 2013 said that 99 percent of Egyptian women have been subjected to harassment. The National Council for Human Rights in November 2012 said that 70 percent of women are harassed in the streets, public spaces and transportation.

This content is from Aswat Masriya

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Photo: Reuters

Egypt’s exports rose by 7 percent year-on-year in May, while imports declined by 19 percent as the country continues to struggle with a foreign currency crisis, Egypt’s Minister of Trade announced on Tuesday.

Exports increased to USD 1.9 billion in May, up from USD 1.7 billion during the same month last year, while total exports from January-May 2016 increased by 3 percent when compared to the same period in 2015, Aswat Masriya reported.

Minister of Trade Tarek Kabil said that these numbers mark a significant improvement from last year, when the value of exports dropped by 16.4 percent.

Meanwhile, the value of imports totaled USD 18 billion during the first four months of the year, down from USD 22.5 billion during the same period last year. Kabil said this drop indicates the success of the trade ministry’s strategy to boost exports and “curb the chaos in imports.”

In an effort to ease the demand on foreign currency crisis in Egypt, the government has introduced a number of restrictions on imports and has instead encouraged reliance on local products, in addition to raising tariff rates on several products.

Egypt has been struggling with a foreign currency crisis since the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime president Hosni Mubarak.

The tourism sector, which was once the country’s top-performing sector and a key earner of hard currency, has been struggling to get back on its feet as a result of the political unrest that followed the 2011 revolution. A series of events, including the “accidental” killing of eight Mexican tourists at the hands of Egyptian security forces and the downing of the Russian passenger plane last year, have also made it difficult for tourism to recover.

The Egyptian pound has also been hard-hit, with the Central Bank of Egypt announcing the currency’s devaluation to EGP 8.95 against the US dollar in March. In the meantime, the country’s black market has flourished, with the US dollar selling for EGP 11 in April.

People light candles during a candlelight vigil for the victims of EgyptAir flight 804, at the Cairo Opera house in Cairo, Egypt May 26, 2016. REUTERS/MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY

People light candles during a candlelight vigil for the victims of EgyptAir flight 804, at the Cairo Opera house in Cairo, Egypt May 26, 2016.
REUTERS/MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY

France launched a manslaughter investigation into the crash of EgyptAir MS804 on Monday, hours after Egyptian investigators announced one of the two damaged black boxes from the flight had successfully been repaired in Paris, Reuters reported.

According to Reuters, the prosecutor is currently not investigating the plane crash as a potential terrorist attack. However, that could change if further evidence emerges suggesting the plane was shot down deliberately, the Associated Press quoted the spokesman for the prosecutor’s office as saying.

Meanwhile, Egyptian investigators said earlier on Monday that French agency BEA have successfully repaired the flight data recorder and will begin working on the cockpit voice recorder “within hours.”

Egypt decided to send the two recorders to BEA, a French government agency that specializes in investigating aviation accidents, to “carry out repair and removal of salt accumulations” on the damaged black boxes, after which they will be sent back to Egypt for data analysis.

Search vessels located the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder, both of which were damaged, earlier this month after having found the main locations of the plane’s wreckage in the Mediterranean.

Data extracted from the cockpit voice recorder will allow investigators to hear what the pilot and co-pilot were saying in the moments before the airplane crashed, and should include any background noise.

Meanwhile, the second black box, containing the flight data recorder, will provide additional data that may allow investigators to determine the cause of the crash.

Flight MS804 vanished at 2:30AM Cairo time on May 19. The passenger plane was carrying 66 people from Paris to Cairo and ”vanished” moments after entering Egyptian airspace. Terrorism and mechanical failure are among the possibilities being explored by the Egyptian investigative committee.

Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt to be Sacrificed

The skeleton of a donkey and several other animals, which were ritualistically sacrificed by Canaanites, have been found at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi in Israel. An analysis of the animal remains revealed that the Canaanites imported the animals from the kingdom of the pharaohs for sacrificial purposes.

The Canaanites, who lived in the city of Gath 5,000 years ago, believed that the gods expected sacrifices from them. According to the latest research described by Haaretz,  they were importing animals from Egypt for this purpose. The remains of a donkey and some sheep and goats, date back to the Early Bronze Age in Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BC). The research proved that the animals were born and bred in the Nile Valley and lived in the Canaanite city only briefly before their death.

The excavation, led by Aren Maeir from Bar-Ilan University, unearthed a very important part of the history connected with trade between Egypt and Canaan in this period. It is the first time that researchers have found bones of traded animals from this period. Until now, only remains from the Middle Bronze Age and later periods have been found.

A painting from a 12th dynasty tomb, which appears to show goats about to be sacrificed in the top panel

A painting from a 12th dynasty tomb, which appears to show goats about to be sacrificed in the top panel (public domain)

The sacrificed donkey was found beneath the foundations of a building. As Maeir explained to Haaretz:

A leftover from Jurassic Times.

Found 30 metres underground at a coal mine, they are dubbed Jurassic pearls or the marbles of a Siberian colossus. The ten spheres are around half the size of a human, a metre or so in diameter, and almost perfectly round and smooth. To add to the mystery, they change color after rain.

They were unearthed by an excavator at Sereulsky coal mine, in the Nazarovo district of Krasnoyarsk region, lying close together.

It was as if they had been carefully buried by a prehistoric giant only to be found many millennia later. Or was there some extra-terrestrial explanation to this geological curiosity now on display at the mine?

The experts have ruled out the more fantastical versions - including theories that they were manmade - and say these stone creations are a leftover from Jurassic times. The strange balls were formed by a natural process likened to the formation of pearls. 

The balls were formed by a natural process likened to the formation of pearls.

The balls were formed by a natural process likened to the formation of pearls.

The balls were formed by a natural process likened to the formation of pearls.

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Do you have a creative idea for a fun event in There? Share your thoughts and help brainstorm themed events with new and seasoned hosts at the weekly Event Planning Meetings. Join your host EmmaJean on Tuesday evenings to discuss planning for future events, holidays and themes in the virtual world There.

The next Event Planning Meeting will take place on June 28th. Sign up for the event and share your ideas.  You can pick up handy brochures of past Event Planning Meeting minutes and monthly calendar events.

Join EmmaJean’s Theme Planning Crew to be a part of the Thereian community that works together to plan and promote fun and lively events in There.


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Lebanese broadcast journalist and TV host Lilian Daoud was arrested on Monday, hours after she ended her contract with ONTV channel, Lawyer Zyad Elelaimy said.

According to Elelaimy, Daoud arrived home only to find eight police officers who led her out of her house to be deported.

Daoud announced earlier today ending her contract with ONTV channel, after five years.

She hosted the TV program “Al Sora Al Kamela” (The Complete Picture).

Dauod was married to Egyptian journalist Khaled el-Berry for six years before their divorce. According to Berry, the fact that she was his wife and is the mother of an Egyptian girl grants her legal right of residence in Egypt.

Berry said in a Facebook post that he witnessed Daoud’s arrest firsthand as he was picking up his daughter from her house.

He said that the officers refused to let Daoud have anything but her wallet and refused to let her contact her lawyer or the Lebanese embassy.

Her lawyer, Elelaimy said so far, the whereabouts of Daoud are unknown.

ONTV is currently owned by a media company that belongs to businessman Abu Hashima.

It was previously owned by renowned business tycoon Naguib Sawiris who sold it to Abu Hashima last May.

This content is from Aswat Masriya

Tiki Talk is a weekly trivia event in There hosted by Francis_7 every Tuesday night. Multiple choice questions are read out loud and trivia participants buzz in when they know the answer. Diverse questions are centered around pop culture, music, television and movies.

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Test your brain power and ability to recall random pieces of information for a chance to show your fellow Thereians how much of a smarty pants you are.

Join Francis_7 this Tuesday for another round of weekly trivia in There.com. Sign up for the next Tiki Talk event here.

Please be advised that Voice is required to participate. You need the ability to hear the host, but you can answer questions with type.

Good luck to all of the Tiki Talk Trivia participants.

 


 

Egypt’s security forces dispersed protests held on Monday in downtown Cairo by high school students demanding the removal of the education minister.

According to eyewitnesses, the security forces used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the protest.

Although the protests commenced in front of the Ministry of Education earlier in the day, the students escaped into various side streets in downtown upon being dispersed by security forces.

The students are calling from the removal of education minister Al-Helali Al-Sherbini due to the minister’s decision to postpone public high school exams after several exams were leaked earlier this month.

Facebook page “Shawming’s Cheats for High School Exams” had posted the questions and model answers of the Arabic language exam 20 minutes into the start of the test. The questions and model answers for the religion examination were also posted before the exam began, leading the Ministry of Education to cancel it.

Members of the Egyptian parliament held the Minister of Education Al Helali Al Sherbini responsible for the leak incident in a hearing following the exam leak. They called for summoning and questioning the minister, while some deputies demanded his resignation.

Protests on June 30 2013 that eventually led to Morsi`s ouster

Protests on June 30 2013 that eventually led to Morsi’s ouster

The Egyptian cabinet announced that the coming Thursday, which coincides with the third anniversary of June 30 mass protests, would be a public holiday.

The cabinet said in a statement on Sunday that the holiday applies to public sector and government employees.

Visits to museums and archaeological sites will be free of charge on Thursday to Egyptians, Arabs and foreigners residing in Egypt, said the cabinet.

June 30 witnessed mass protests against the rule of the first democratically elected then-president Mohamed Morsi, who hailed from the Muslim Brotherhood group. The protests then marked one year anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration as president in June 2012.

Days after the protests, the Egyptian military, led by general-turned-President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, ousted Morsi, who rebuffed the army’s 48 hour ultimatum to resolve the crisis.

Nearly a year after Morsi’s ouster, Sisi swept to victory in Egyptian presidential elections, winning  96.91 per cent of Egyptian votes then.

This content is by Aswat Masriya.

Iowa State forward Abdel Nader (2) dunks over Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Monday, Feb. 29, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Iowa State forward Abdel Nader (2) dunks over Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Monday, Feb. 29, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Egyptian basketball player Abdel Nader has been selected to join the Boston Celtics in the 2016 National Basketball Association (NBA) draft, making him the second Egyptian in history to join the NBA.

23-year-old Nader, who was born in Alexandria, was the Celtics’ 58th pick on Thursday and is currently the only Egyptian in the NBA.

“It gets to the last couple of picks and you’re thinking it’s over. Then you hear your name and it’s relieving,” the Boston Celtics’ official website quoted Nader as saying. “I knew they had a high interest, but I didn’t know if they were going to call my name, so it was definitely a surprise.”

He began his basketball career when he moved from Alexandria to the United States and began playing for the team at Niles North High School in Illinois. According to KingFut, he helped lead his team to its first sectional championship since the school was established 47 years earlier.

Nader went on to win a number of accolades, play for two seasons at Northern Illinois University, then transferred to Iowa State University, where he is currently playing his last season as a senior student.

Lebanese army soldiers secure the area near the site where suicide bomb attacks took place in the Christian village of Qaa, in the Bekaa valley, Lebanon June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Hassan Abdallah

Lebanese army soldiers secure the area near the site where suicide bomb attacks took place in the Christian village of Qaa, in the Bekaa valley, Lebanon June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Hassan Abdallah

At least five people were killed and more than 15 injured after four suicide bombers attacked a Christian-majority village in north-eastern Lebanon, close to the border with Syria.

According to Al-Manar TV, the attack was carried out by ISIS militants in the village of Qaa and killed five villagers.

Meanwhile, the National News Agency reported that the attack first started with one suicide bomber detonating his vest before three others detonating theirs as civilians gathered to inspect the scene.

However, Lebanon’s mayor told AFP that security forces thwarted the attack by chasing the fourth attacker, shooting at him, and forcing him to detonate his vest without harming anyone.

The mayor described Qaa as a “gateway to the rest of Lebanon” and hailed security forces’ quick response.

First responders, including soldiers, are among those injured in the explosions.

ISIS has claimed previous suicide bombings in Lebanon. In November 2015, two suicide bombers killed 43 people in a suburb of Beirut, sparking worldwide condemnation.

Illustration of a Paleoindian campsite

First Nations archaeologists in New Brunswick, Canada, are unearthing hundreds of artifacts and exposing a campsite where their distant ancestors lived about 12,000 years ago. It is one of the earliest sites in eastern North America, occupied not long after the glaciers started to recede northward.

So far, the excavations have turned up about 600 artifacts, says an article about the dig on CTV News Atlantic. The archaeologists are working in an area near Fredericton where there was to have been a highway bypass. But construction workers kept finding things that seemed significant, so work was halted and the archaeologists called in.

The site is extremely important to understanding the prehistoric peoples of the region.

The archaeologist leading the dig, Brent Suttie with the government of New Brunswick, said the area was first vegetated after the recession of glaciers, around 13,800 to 13,500 years ago.

Paleoindian points from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island

Paleoindian points from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island (Image from the Canadian Museum of History)

REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

By Abdel Kader Ramadan

Egypt’s stocks hit a 14-week low on Sunday, with the country’s benchmark index EGX30 index falling by 5.54 percent as investors panicked following Britain voting in favor of leaving the European Union on Thursday.

Analysts had predicted that the Egyptian stock market would face setbacks on Sunday. Mohamed Radwan, a Sales Manager at Pharos Holding for Financial Investments, expected Egypt’s bourse to see a “huge slump” in the wake of Britain’s vote.

The results of the British referendum came out on Friday with more than 50 percent voting to leave the EU.

Global financial markets plunged, the British pound tumbled as much as 10 percent against the dollar for the first time in 30 years after the referendum results were announced. Oil prices also dropped five percent at the end of trading on Friday.

The British vote also led to the resignation of Prime Minister David Cameron, who announced his intention to step down in October. The minister, who led the ‘remain’ campaign, said on Friday the country requires a new leadership to “stir the country to its next destination.”

Eissa Fathy, the managing director of a Cairo-based securities firm anticipates a “difficult day” as investors in Egypt will be greatly affected by the fall in global markets following Britain’s decision.

According to Reuters, the shock wave of Britain’s vote made European shares slide, wiping about 650 billion euros (USD 726 billion) from the market value of Europe’s listed shares .

The pan-European STOXX Europe 600 index fell seven per cent to 321.9 points, its biggest one-day fall since 2008, while the FTSEurofirst 300, Reuters reported.

US stocks also fell sharply, with investors turning to gold and US treasury bonds, both of which are seen as safe havens. Investors also avoided purchasing assets that involve higher risks, such as stocks and oil.

Fathy said that the trading of shares of some Egyptian companies in London’s bourse, including the Commercial International Bank (CIB) which constitutes the heaviest market weight in the Egyptian stock market, will contribute greatly to the slump.

The director of customer accounts at Okaz Securities Brokerage Ahmed Zakaria said that investors were “shocked,” especially that opinion polls held before the voting were in favor of remaining in the EU, which had initially relieved investors and prompted global stocks to surge.

Zakaria predicted the fallout of Britain’s vote to be similar the financial crisis in 2008.

Radwan pointed to the fragility in the Egyptian stock market, saying that the low trading volume will lead to a “fast and violent” slump, especially given the fact that the Egyptian market is in an already weak position.

The Egyptian stock market strongly declined in the last two trading sessions after CIB failed to sell its investment bank CI Capital to Beltone financial, the central bank decided to raise the interest rate by two percent, and fears of the repercussions of Brexit on the global economy spread.

Radwan expects the market to continue fluctuating over the next week.

Zakaria also noted that the Egyptian bourse records stronger declines, compared to other markets, during global crises, due to credit and margin trading problems which push investors to sell more than usual.

The decline in the Egyptian stock market may not persist for long, given that decrease in prices will represent opportunities for those who want to seize them, Fathy said.

Content from Aswat Masriya, editing by Egyptian Streets

Photo: Daily News Egypt

Photo: Daily News Egypt

Egypt’s Administrative Court adjourned on Sunday the session for the appeal against the annulment of the Red Sea islands to July 3 after a request from the annulment’s supporters to replace the judge.

The Court had ruled last week that the agreement transferring the islands of Tiran and Sanafir to Saudi Arabia was void, with Judge Yehia El-Dakroury ruling that the islands should remain part of Egyptian territory and that Egyptian sovereignty extends over the islands of Tiran and Sanafir.

The Egyptian government immediately appealed the annulment decision, causing some Egyptians to voice their anger and saying that the decision to appeal is preposterous.

“The Egyptian gov is probably the only gov in history to fight for GIVING land to another country,” wrote Rana Allam, the former Editor-in-Chief of Daily News Egypt, in a public status on Facebook.

Protestors inside the State Council on Sunday began chanting slogans such as “Awad sold his land,” a reference to an Egyptian song about a farmer who sold his land, and “Bread, freedom, these islands are Egyptian,” which is a play on one of the most popular chants from Egypt’s January 25, 2011 revolution.

Egypt’s government stirred controversy in early April when the Cabinet announced that Egypt and Saudi Arabia had signed a maritime border demarcation agreement after six years of negotiations and that Egypt would cede control of the two islands to the Kingdom.

Dozens of citizens demonstrated against the agreement on April 15 and 25 in scattered protests that were quashed by security forces. Authorities arrested hundreds of protesters, sentencing 152 of them to two to five years of imprisonment, and collecting fines worth 4.7 million EGP. Others were arrested by security forces from their homes and from cafés in anticipation of the April 25 protests.

However, last week, an Egyptian court acquitted 22 protesters who had been accused of illegally protesting and assembling against the decision to transfer the islands.

Photo: Daily News Egypt

Photo: Daily News Egypt

Egypt’s Administrative Court postponed on Sunday the session for the appeal against the annulment of the Red Sea islands to July 3.

The Court had ruled last week that the agreement transferring the islands of Tiran and Sanafir to Saudi Arabia was void, with Judge Yehia El-Dakroury ruling that the islands should remain part of Egyptian territory and that Egyptian sovereignty extends over the islands of Tiran and Sanafir.

The Egyptian government immediately appealed the annulment decision, causing some Egyptians to voice their anger and saying that the decision to appeal is preposterous.

“The Egyptian gov is probably the only gov in history to fight for GIVING land to another country,” wrote Rana Allam, the former Editor-in-Chief of Daily News Egypt, in a public status on Facebook.

Protestors inside the State Council on Sunday began chanting slogans such as “Awad sold his land,” a reference to an Egyptian song about a farmer who sold his land, and “Bread, freedom, these islands are Egyptian,” which is a play on one of the most popular chants from Egypt’s January 25, 2011 revolution.

Egypt’s government stirred controversy in early April when the Cabinet announced that Egypt and Saudi Arabia had signed a maritime border demarcation agreement after six years of negotiations and that Egypt would cede control of the two islands to the Kingdom.

Dozens of citizens demonstrated against the agreement on April 15 and 25 in scattered protests that were quashed by security forces. Authorities arrested hundreds of protesters, sentencing 152 of them to two to five years of imprisonment, and collecting fines worth 4.7 million EGP. Others were arrested by security forces from their homes and from cafés in anticipation of the April 25 protests.

However, last week, an Egyptian court acquitted 22 protesters who had been accused of illegally protesting and assembling against the decision to transfer the islands.

Photo: Mohamed Nassar via Facebook

Photo: Mohamed Nassar via Facebook

A small protest broke out inside Egypt’s State Council, where lawyers and activists are awaiting the court’s decision in the Red Sea islands case.

According to Facebook user Mohamed Nassar, protestors inside the State Council are chanting slogans such as “Awad sold his land,” a reference to an Egyptian song about a farmer who sold his land, and “Bread, freedom, these islands are Egyptian,” which is a play on one of the most popular chants from Egypt’s January 25, 2011 revolution.

 

The Administrative Court is currently looking into an appeal from Egypt’s government against the Court’s decision to annul the controversial border demarcation agreement with Saudi Arabia that resulted in Egypt ceding control of two Red Sea islands.

Egypt’s Cabinet announced in April that Egypt and Saudi Arabia signed the demarcation agreement following six years of negotiations and that the two islands, Tiran and Sanafir, fell within Saudi Arabian territory.

The announcement quickly sparked widespread controversy, with many lambasting the Egyptian government for carrying out the negotiations “in secret,” and others saying that the government sold part of Egypt’s land in return for Saudi Arabian aid.

Former presidency candidate Khaled Ali, along with rights lawyers Malek Adly and Tarek Al-Awady had filed a complaint against the handover of the Red Sea islands after gathering thousands of petitions. Adly was later arrested over charges of “spreading rumors that would disrupt public security” and “harming national unity,” among other charges, and was not released.

Following demonstrations on April 15 and 25 that decried the land transfer, authorities had arrested hundreds of protesters, sentencing 152 of them to two to five years of imprisonment, and collecting fines worth 4.7 million EGP. Others were arrested by security forces from their homes and from cafés in anticipation of the April 25 protests.

Last week, however, an Egyptian court acquitted 22 protesters who had been accused of illegally protesting and assembling against the decision to transfer the islands.

 

The excavated shop. Inset: Skeletons found in a shop near the Porto Ercolano at Pompeii.

Archaeologists carrying out excavations on the outskirts of the Roman city of Pompeii have discovered the remains of four people in the ruins of an ancient shop. It is believed that they had gathered in the shop to seek shelter from the violent eruption of Mount Vesuvius, when it erupted in 79 A.D., burying the city in ashes.

The discovery was made by an Italian and French archaeological team, who were excavating a site at Porta Ercolano, located on the outskirts of Pompeii on a road leading to Herculaneum.

View of the northwest gate of Pompeii, the Porta Ercolano, leading to Herculaneum

View of the northwest gate of Pompeii, the Porta Ercolano, leading to Herculaneum (Roger Ulrich / Flickr)

A City Frozen in Time

Pompeii was an ancient Roman city near modern-day Naples in Italy, which was wiped out and buried under 6 metres of ash and pumice following the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.  It is an eerie feeling to walk the empty streets of Pompeii and to view shops and homes left virtually untouched for nearly two millennia.

When archaeologists discovered the ancient city, they found the city almost entirely intact –  loaves of bread still sat in the oven, the remains of meals remained discarded on the pavement, and the bodies of men, women, children, and pets were found frozen in their last moments, the expressions of fear still etched on their faces.

President Barack Obama speaks with Mai Medhat at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Stanford, Calif., Friday, June 24, 2016 (AP/Jeff Chiu)

President Barack Obama speaks with Mai Medhat at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Stanford, Calif., Friday, June 24, 2016 (AP/Jeff Chiu)

Mai Medhat, co-founder and CEO of Eventtus, an online platform and mobile app for events, has inspired many across Egypt as she spoke on stage with U.S. President Barack Obama and Facebook’s Marck Zuckerberg on Friday 24 June.

The panel discussion, which has been written about across international media outlets, also included two other young entrepreneurs: Jean Bosco from ‪Rwanda‬, Mariana Costa Checa from ‪Peru‬.

The panel was held during the Global Entrepreneurship Summit 2016 which took place at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California from the 22nd to the 24th of June 2016.

Watch the full panel below

Mai was amongst 11 other entrepreneurs who had been chosen to represent the Egyptian entrepreneurial scene at the summit.

On 1 June in a prior event to the summit, Ziad Haider, the Special Representative for Commercial and Business Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, visited Cairo for the ‘Road to GES 2016: Cairo’ event. During his visit, Haider met with senior Egyptian officials and business leaders  promote the potential of entrepreneurship and innovation to raise living standards, create jobs, and build strong marketplaces that meet the needs of consumers.

Egypt’s entrepreneurial scene has been on the rise since the 25 January revolution in 2011. While Egypt’s economy and political spheres suffered, the youth have found innovative ways to achieve change through grass-roots initiatives and entrepreneurial projects.

Great Pyramid of Giza Was Lopsided Due to Construction Error

Research carried out by engineer Glen Dash and Egyptologist Mark Lehner has revealed that the Great Pyramid of Giza is not as perfect as once believed. Results of testing showed that its base was built  lopsided.

According to LiveScience, the builders of the Great Pyramid made a small mistake while constructing it. The new research reveals that the west side of the pyramid is slightly longer than the east side. It means that the long lasting myth about the perfection of this construction is not true. Dash and Lehner detected the small flaw in a new measuring project carried out with the support of Glen Dash Research Foundation and Ancient Egypt Research Associates (AERA). Mapping and excavating the Giza plateau by AERA took about 30 years.

As Glen Dash wrote in his report:

``Originally, the Great Pyramid was clad in more than 21 acres of hard, white casing stones that the Egyptians had hauled over from quarries at Tura across the Nile. Most of those casing stones were removed centuries ago for building material, leaving the pyramid as we see it today, without most of its original shell. The photo below was taken along the pyramid’s north side. In it, we see some of the pyramid’s few remaining casing stones still in place. These sit on a platform that originally extended out 39 to 47 centimeters (15–19 inches) beyond the outer, lower edge (the “foot”) of the casing. Behind the casing stones in the photo we can see the rougher masonry that makes up the bulk of the pyramid as it stands today.``

`Lost Colony’

Archaeologists have discovered possible evidence of the lost colony of Roanoke, Virginia, in the form of two European pottery pieces near a site where the colonists settled in the 1580s.

The researchers say the pottery fragments may be part of a medicine jar of Thomas Harriot, an important member of one of the expeditions, or of one of other colonists, according to the Virginian Pilot.

The possible ointment or medicine jar was about 3 inches (7.62 cm) tall and 1.5 inches (3.81 cm) in diameter and is the most significant pottery find in the area since the 1940s, Eric Deetz, an archaeologist with the First Colony Foundation, told the paper.

The two pieces of pottery, possibly of a medicine jar, that archaeologists are saying may have belonged to members of the lost colony of Roanoke.

The two pieces of pottery, possibly of a medicine jar, that archaeologists are saying may have belonged to members of the lost colony of Roanoke. (U.S. National Park Service photo)

It’s possible Harriot or members of the colony mixed ointments or medicines in the jar, Deetz said. One of the plants that may have been used as an herbal cure was sassafras, which was plentiful on Roanoke Island and was thought to relieve syphilis and other ailments.

The `black boxes` retrieved from EgyptAir flight MS804 (AFP/Media center of the Egyptian Ministry of Civil Aviation)

The ‘black boxes’ retrieved from EgyptAir flight MS804 (AFP/Media center of the Egyptian Ministry of Civil Aviation)

Egypt’s initial attempts to retrieve data from the black boxes of EgyptAir flight MS804 have failed and “key parts” of the flight data and voice recorders will be sent to France next week for repairs.

According to a Thursday statement from EgyptAir, the French agency BEA (Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses) will “carry out repair and removal of salt accumulations” on the damaged black boxes, after which they will be sent back to Egypt for data analysis.

BEA is a French government agency that specializes in investigating aviation accidents.

Search vessels located the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder, both of which were damaged, earlier this month after having found the main locations of the plane’s wreckage in the Mediterranean.

Data extracted from the cockpit voice recorder will allow investigators to hear what the pilot and co-pilot were saying in the moments before the airplane crashed, and should include any background noise.

Meanwhile, the second black box, containing the flight data recorder, will provide additional data that may allow investigators to determine the cause of the crash.

Flight MS804 vanished at 2:30AM Cairo time on May 19. The passenger plane was carrying 66 people from Paris to Cairo and ”vanished” moments after entering Egyptian airspace. Terrorism and mechanical failure are among the possibilities being explored by the investigative committee.

On Thursday, Egyptian Prime Minister Sherif Ismail issued a decree officially declaring the plane’s passengers deceased, while EgyptAir chairman Safwat Mosallam announced that the airline will be allocating a “temporary” compensation of USD 25,000 to each family of the plane’s victims.

Britain`s Prime Minister David Cameron (R) speaks during a news conference with Egypt`s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at Number 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, November 5, 2015. Photo: Andy Rain / Reuters

Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron (R) speaks during a news conference with Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at Number 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, November 5, 2015. Photo: Andy Rain / Reuters

Following the referendum vote early on Friday, June 24th, the United Kingdom’s historic exit from the European Union from the economic, legal and political perspective has enormous implications on its ties with Egypt. Early economic forecasts on Friday morning show worldwide economic markets in turmoil and instability as investors continue to monitor the British pound plummet.

It is important to note that the referendum is not instantaneously legally binding and solely serves as an advisory instrument and not an obligatory one. Legally, the British government may invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty. Until the Prime Minister does so, this means that the United Kingdom is still a member state of the European Union and must still abide by EU law and legislation.

Egypt has had longstanding and strong relations with the United Kingdom in the political, defense, trade, and investment landscapes. The Egyptian-British Chamber of Commerce (EBCC) upholds that trade continues to thrive between the two nations since 2014, and Egypt enjoys a free-trade agreement with the EU.

Tourism from the United Kingdom brings in roughly 200,000 British tourists a year. The grave consequences on the British economy means that the Egyptian tourism industry will be hit hard: households will curb expenditure on tourism caused by the drop in the sterling. Not such good news after British Airways recently suspended flights to Sharm El-Sheikh amid terror fears.

What happens next in the political arena is yet to be seen. Egypt has enjoyed a relatively docile relationship with the United Kingdom and maintains strong diplomatic ties with the nation. Future political uncertainty that plagues the United Kingdom may very well affect foreign policy with Egypt.

A lack of strong leadership and the resignation of David Cameron means that British-Egyptian bilateral ties may weaken. Egyptian engagement with the United Kingdom will be difficult, particularly as its relationship with NATO could change. Joint military arrangements could suffer as Britain is one of the major military powers in Europe. The United States might cease to provide a bridge between NATO and the European Union, which will upset the political and economic balance of power.

Britain’s foreign direct investment (FDI) in Egypt makes up approximately 41.5 percent. A European Union without the United Kingdom will be a more regulated Union and will therefore raise obstacles to trade to, thus losing its competitive edge. The plummet of the sterling pound and investment capital will greatly impact the Egyptian economy.

How does Brexit impact British-Egyptian trade?

The United Kingdom currently has 53 trade agreements, some of which are dependent on its former membership with the European Union (the world’s biggest trade area) and its direct market access to Europe.

The European Union is Egypt’s primary trading partner and covers 22.9 percent of Egypt’s trade volume in 2013 and ranks first as both Egypt’s import and export partner, with a collective population of 500 million. The Egypt-EU Association, signed in 2004, ‘establishes a free-trade area with the elimination of tariffs on industrial products and significant concessions on agricultural products. Brexit will greatly affect Egyptian market access to the EU and most importantly will curb the ease of trade as bilateral negotiations and liberalization policies come to a halt with new protectionist measures on trade put in place.

Since 2004, EU-Egypt bilateral trade has more than doubled and reached its highest level in 2014 (from 11.8 billion euros in 2004 to 25.5 billion in 2014). Post-Brexit rising taxes will likely affect this volume of trade. Former head of the World Trade Organization Pascal Lamy has stated that Brexit’s will have a ripple effect on rising British import tariffs on countries’ goods, meaning that its Egyptian trade partner will be restricted access to the market.

Egyptian business owners who conduct business and/or trade with the United Kingdom will cross their fingers that the UK sustain as many ties as possible with Europe.

EU Referendum - Signage And Symbols

Prime Minister David Cameron announced his resignation as the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union after shocking results.

The Prime Minister said he would leave his post in October and that he would attempt to “steady the ship” before his departure.

“The British people have voted to leave the European Union and their will must be respected,” said the Prime Minister. “The will of the British people is an instruction that must be delivered.”

A total of 17,176,006 ballots, or 52 percent, were in favor of leaving the EU, while 15,952,444 ballots, or 48 percent, were in favor of remaining.

This is why Trump can win the U.S. presidency. People are fed up with conventional politicians. #EUreferendum

— Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) June 24, 2016

“Let June 23rd go down in history as our independence day,” said UK Independence Party leader Nigel Farage at a speech to his supporters.

“I hope this victory brings down this failed project and leads to a Europe of sovereign nation states.”

Shouts of “shame” & “that’s disgusting” at Remain party when Nigel Farage said Leave had won the #euref “without a shot being fired”

— James Landale (@BBCJLandale) June 24, 2016

Reacting to the vote, the British Pound dropped to its lowest level since 1985. According to Sky News, this marked “a sharper dive even than on Black Wednesday in 1992.” S&P confirmed that the UK is likely to lose its final AAA credit rating as a result of political, financial and economic risks associated with the UK’s decision to leave the EU.

POUND STERLING DROPS BELOW 1.35, LOWEST LEVEL SINCE 1985

— David Ingles (@DavidInglesTV) June 24, 2016

This is what has happened to the Pound. Britain has voted to leave the EU (via Bloomberg)#EUref pic.twitter.com/M5gO6vlnCe

— Nabeela Zahir (@NabeelaZahir) June 24, 2016

Meanwhile, some Scottish politicians have reacted angrily, vowing to pursue an independent Scotland as 62% of Scottish voters voted to remain in the EU.

Goodbye, UK. https://t.co/HMRA0AnlWR

— J.K. Rowling (@jk_rowling) June 24, 2016

The First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon of the Scottish National Party (SNP) warned there would be consequences, adding that Scotland “sees its future as part of the EU.”

Northern Ireland also voted to remain, with the oldest political party calling for another vote on independence if Britain exits the EU.

In Europe, most governments are yet to comment on the UK decision. Germany’s Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said on twitter that the vote marked a sad day for Europe.

“The news from Britain is really sobering. It looks like a sad day for Europe and Britain,” said the German Foreign Minister.

The turnout for the vote was very high, with the Electoral Commission announcing a turnout of 72.2 percent with a total of 33,568,184 ballot papers recorded.

This story is developing.

Buildings and Nile River in Cairo, Egypt

Buildings and Nile River in Cairo, Egypt

By Yasmine Nazmy, progrss

Although Talaat Harb is often credited with introducing entrepreneurship to Cairo with his founding of Banque Misr, Egyptian entrepreneurship has much deeper roots. In fact, since its founding in 973, Cairo was designed first and foremost as a commercial and manufacturing hub, with artisans and craftsmen clustering their businesses in various parts of the city. Today, those business clusters still exist, from the car-repair workshops of El Hirafiyyeen and the tile and marble manufacturers of Shaq El Tho’ban, to electronic equipment providers in Downtown’s El Bustan and the hustle of mobile and electronic accessories’ traders on Abdel-Aziz Street.

One of Cairo’s first known entrepreneurs, sixteenth century Egyptian merchant Ismail Abu Taqiyya “…anticipat[ed] Starbucks by several centuries” by importing coffee to Egypt from Mocha in Yemen. Far from risk-averse, his choice to finance coffeehouses came at a time when coffee and coffeehouses were highly politicized, and when puritanical scholars perceived the drink as sinful. Abu Taqiyya also invested heavily in the sugar industry, and although he had a conglomerate that stretched from India to Nigeria during his lifetime, it fell apart after he died, leaving little of his innovative brand of entrepreneurship behind. And while there are traces of others like Abu Taqiyya, there is little to no record of them, making it almost impossible for historians to piece together the many stories of early Egyptian entrepreneurs.

The artisan-entrerpreneur is one of the first types of entrepreneurs to exist in Cairo. Khan el-Khalili Craftsman by Mark Fischer, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

The artisan-entrerpreneur is one of the first types of entrepreneurs to exist in Cairo.
Khan el-Khalili Craftsman by Mark Fischer, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

But the kind of entrepreneurialism that was so inherent to Abu Taqiyya’s vision has waned over the years, and in spite of many similar examples of early entrepreneurialism, entrepreneurship remained largely absent from mainstream business language until very recently – although Cairo has no dearth of entrepreneurs, large and small. In the twentieth century, entrepreneurship among the middle class gave way first to the retirement-plan-guaranteed government jobs that were so popular between the 1950s and 1960s, and later, to large contracting businesses and clear-career-path multinational jobs that characterized post-Infitah neo-liberalism. On the ground, however, entrepreneurs like Abu Taqiyya continue to operate, although they – like their historical counterparts – remain largely invisible.

New Words, Old Practice

Today, innovators like Abu Taqiyya are considered entrepreneurs and their brand of entrepreneurship is referred to as riyyadit a’mal. And although a number of factors have compounded to bring entrepreneurship into mainstream business language in Egypt, US President Barack Obama’s speech “A New Beginning” at Egypt’s Cairo University in 2009 is clearly one of the sparks. The summit that he promised to hold in 2009 has since become the annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES)– the seventh edition of which is being held in Silicon Valley this June. Since then, the word riyyadat al-a’mal (which, although more familiar, still doesn’t quite roll off the tongue) has come to be closely associated with high-growth, tech-driven and innovation-driven entrepreneurship.

Besides the American president’s speech, other factors have contributed to making entrepreneurship more attractive to (particularly young) Egyptians. These include years of donor efforts; the after-effects of the global financial crisis; the compounding of efforts of various ecosystem players – including government, NGOs, and private sector; and a paradigm shift in perceptions of social norms (not to mention an interest in tech) that followed the outbreak of the 2011 revolution.

maps2

According to Assistant Professor and Abdul Latif Jameel Endowed Chair of Entrepreneurship and Director of the American University in Cairo’s Venture Lab Ayman Ismail, entrepreneurial startups come in various types, sizes and rates of growth. “For me, someone who opens a new business, be it a technology company, a small store, or a workshop is entrepreneurial. S/he is taking the initiative, assuming risks, and putting together the resources to build this new business. The business might grow and become a large retail chain or it might stay small for 50 years, this is more about the entrepreneurs’ choice and the market potential,” he says.

And while Ismail is proficient in his definition, interviews with 20 professionals working in business and entrepreneurial support industries failed to produce a single cohesive definition of entrepreneurship – partially a reflection of just how loose our understanding of the term is today.

Angel investor and serial entrepreneur Con O’Donnell has lived in Cairo for upwards of 20 years and is now based at the downtownGrEEK Campus – a tech hub established in what used the be the American University in Cairo by entrepreneur and co-founder of Sawari Ventures Ahmed El Alfy. In 2001, O’Donnell founded media startup Sarmady – which includes websites like filgoal.com, filfan.com and filbalad.com – which he then sold to Vodafone in 2008. Today, he is part of the lead team at RiseUp Egypt, an annual summit that hosted over 4,000 attendees from 49 countries at the three-day event last year, and the GrEEK Campus’s concrete walls still bear RiseUp’s strong yellow paint when I meet him there.

As someone who has closely been closely involved in developing a culture around entrepreneurship in Cairo, O’Donnell is quick to admit that one of the biggest challenges is the inaccessibility of the language in general. “Some effort needs to be made to translate the language into plain English and then into plain Arabic. Some inroads have been made…but you want the muppets talking about it as well and that has to happen organically,” he says.

At Ataba Square, a popular market and gathering of entrepreneurs.

At Ataba Square, a popular market and gathering of informal market entrepreneurs.

 Turning To Tech

Although the close association between tech and entrepreneurship is part of a larger global trend, it is no surprise that tech takes the cake when it comes to attractiveness to both entrepreneurs and investors in Egypt. Around the world, success stories like Facebook, e-Bay, and Amazon, and more recently, Uber and Airbnb, have inspired tech-savvy youth to take the plunge. International media coverage of these businesses and their founders have made for inspirational personal stories that digitally-native young Egyptians would seek to emulate (one interviewee reported a business plan competition contestant referring to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg as “Mark” when describing his social media platform).

And indeed, both the public and private sector have invested heavily in tech over the past 10 years; between 2005 and 2013, the number of ICT companies increased from 1,716 to 5,559 and ICT revenues tripled from US 25 billion to 75 billion – with most of those revenues coming from the offshoring industry. ICT 2020 – the government’s medium-term strategy for the ICT sector – will see EGP 124.8 billion (US 17 billion) injected into the sector over the next six years, with the objective of more than doubling ICT as a share of GDP during that time (ICT represented just 4.1% of GDP in 2015). In the meantime, the rate of internet penetration – which almost doubled from 16 million users in 2009 to almost 31 million in 2016 – indicates that access to tech, like tech, is changing fast.

Experts elsewhere have indicated that tech – and the unprecedented scope, scale and economic impact of technology as a disruptive force in human history – is one of just four global forces defining what the future will look like, which explains why so many are looking to the industry. In many ways, tech today is doing what global trade did for sixteenth century merchants like Abu Taqiyya. According to Tarek Assaad, Managing Partner at Ideavelopers – a venture capital firm that invests in early-stage tech-startups – technology is attractive because of its scalability as well as its potential to address developmental problems. He explains that, while a lot remains to be done, the opportunities abound for tech entrepreneurs. “Egypt has a way to go and we can move the needle on a little of critical issues.”

The GrEEK Campus during RiseUp Summit 2015. Photo by CairoZoom.

According to entrepreneur Hashem El Dandarawy, the primary reason that so many youth, who have little to lose but their time, turn to tech entrepreneurship is the low barrier to entry (the UNDP puts youth unemployment at 34%). El Dandarawy began his career as a rice trader in East Africa before returning to Egypt to work in agricultural development and later established K-9 Sense – a company that provides products and services for the training and care of canines.

Sitting on the 10-acre suburban property that houses his kennel Eastwind, he discusses some of the challenges of perceiving entrepreneurship through the narrow lens of tech. According to him, the emphasis on tech entrepreneurship is partially the result of a “theme of success” associated with tech in Europe and the U.S., which, while valuable, does not always address local challenges. The Upper Egyptian, who owns the educational NGO Dandara Cultural Center, which has 64 centers in Upper Egypt, speaks of the need for a more accessible vocabulary that is better suited to local needs.

“If you want to support entrepreneurs, define entrepreneurship using a common word that the person on the street will understand. But the word riyyadet el a’mal is Chinese – it doesn’t mean anything to a lot of people. When you bring it down to a digestible vocabulary and show me what you mean, people can get behind it,” he says.

Owner of The Courtyard and CEO of Misr Contracting Company Mohamed El Sawy agrees with him, noting that: “It’s all well and good that people are calling themselves entrepreneurs, but we’re still talking about a very specific socioeconomic class that understands this terminology. If you talk about the majority of the population, they have no idea what you’re talking about.”

In spite of the opening of malls and commercial plazas in various parts of the city, Abdel Aziz Street is the go-to place for electronics in Cairo.

In spite of the proliferation of malls and commercial plazas in various parts of the city, Abdel Aziz Street is the go-to place for electronics in Cairo.

Others note that entrepreneurs in Egypt abound – although most of them can be found plying the parallel or informal market for opportunities, and rarely do they call themselves entrepreneurs. According to management consultant-turned-entrepreneur and co-founder of price comparison site Yaoota Mohamed Ewis, entrepreneurship in the informal sector is immeasurable, making any attempts to quantify or understand the entrepreneurial capacity on the ground practically impossible. “I’m convinced that anything innovative that is happening is something that you and I have not heard about. You have people roaming the streets with merchandise while we sit here in an overhyped bubble. This idea that software eats the world just does not apply to Egypt,” he says as he sits at his desk in the GrEEK Campus. Ewis’ statements ring true when put in context of a 2014 study that estimated that Egypt’s informal economy was worth up to 70% of the formal economy “with a value as high as EGP 1.5 trillion (US 204.5 billion).”

“Very few businesses solve the country’s structural problems. Nobody innovates the last mile fulfillment. Even Bey2ollak, which people raved about as a success story for years became obsolete the minute Google turned on their traffic button,” he adds. (Bey2ollak, a crowd-sourced traffic app that has been hailed as a success story for years, is searching for new strategies to stay relevant in a fast-changing market).

Indeed, according to third generation entrepreneur and CEO of Lotfy footwear Bassem Lotfy, the sheer size of the parallel market (and the complete lack of controls on it), is the reason that many formal businesses are floundering; and with so many businesses (and business owners) choosing to stay “invisible” to evade taxes and forego government bureaucracy, it is no surprise that so many non-tech entrepreneurs remain largely unknown. “I met a businessman who has a number of different factories that make everything from PVC to shoes. He’s a very successful entrepreneur, but he’s invisible. His factories are registered but his sales are off the books,” says Lotfy.

Lotfy explains that, when his grandfather founded Lotfy in the 1950s, the business was more about making shoes and less about branding. “My grandfather made shoes for regular people and for the military, and it wasn’t until my father came along that he built it into a brand and developed Coochi.” Since then, Coochi – a popular brand of sneakers made by Lotfy – has entered into common parlance as the word that people use to refer to sneakers in general.

More importantly, the story of the 10-year-old boy who jumped on a train to the capital and built a shoe empire that still lives on demonstrates once again how entrepreneurship has deep and meaningful roots that pre-date the words that we use to refer to it today.

This piece was originally published on progrss.com and is part of the #urbaneconomics Cairo series commissioned by District coworking space. Follow progrss for more parts here.

sisiunitednations

Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi addresses the 69th United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York, September 24, 2014.

Egypt was elected on Thursday to join the United Nation’s Human Rights Council, with its membership starting in 2017 and ending in 2021.

According to the Foreign Ministry spokesperson Ahmed Abu Zeid, 26 countries competed for nine seats in “intense” elections, reported MENA.

The Foreign Ministry spokesperson added that the victory reflects trust by the international community in Egypt.

“It is a powerful message to those who doubted Egypt’s loyalty to its international and constitutional human rights commitments,” said Abu Zeid.

The Council is made of 47 Member States which are elected by the majority of members of the UN General Assembly through direct and secret ballot. Members of the Council serve for a period of three years and are not eligible for immediate re-election after serving two consecutive terms.

The Council is responsible for the promotion and protection of all human rights around the globe.

Egypt’s victory comes despite criticism by international organizations, such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, regarding the country’s human rights record under President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi.

However, despite such criticism, Egypt has continued to win seats in key UN councils and committees.

Egypt officially locked a two-year, non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council after 179 of the 193 UN member states voted in favor of its membership in October 2015.

Two months later, the Security Council  appointed Egypt as the head of the Counter-Terrorism Committee (CTC).

Egypt’s Foreign Minister has vowed to promote women’s rights, regional issues, and an anti-terror agenda during his country’s membership at the Security Council and the CTC.

EU Referendum - Signage And Symbols

The United Kingdom is set to leave the European Union after shocking results, forecasts the BBC, Sky News and other British media.

With more than 29 million votes counted so far, 52% of votes counted have been in support of leaving the EU, while 48% voted to remain in the EU.

This is why Trump can win the U.S. presidency. People are fed up with conventional politicians. #EUreferendum

— Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) June 24, 2016

“Let June 23rd go down in history as our independence day,” said UK Independence Party leader Nigel Farage at a speech to his supporters.

“I hope this victory brings down this failed project and leads to a Europe of sovereign nation states.”

Shouts of “shame” & “that’s disgusting” at Remain party when Nigel Farage said Leave had won the #euref “without a shot being fired”

— James Landale (@BBCJLandale) June 24, 2016

Reacting to the vote, the British Pound dropped to its lowest level since 1985. According to Sky News, this marked “a sharper dive even than on Black Wednesday in 1992.”

POUND STERLING DROPS BELOW 1.35, LOWEST LEVEL SINCE 1985

— David Ingles (@DavidInglesTV) June 24, 2016

This is what has happened to the Pound. Britain has voted to leave the EU (via Bloomberg)#EUref pic.twitter.com/M5gO6vlnCe

— Nabeela Zahir (@NabeelaZahir) June 24, 2016

The turnout for the vote was very high, with the Electoral Commission announcing a turnout of 72.2 percent with a total of 33,568,184 ballot papers recorded.

This story is developing.

The Caribbean Sea from space

A study of the Caribbean Sea by University of Liverpool ocean scientists has revealed that, in the midst of all the noise of the ocean, this region behaves like a whistle, which blows so loudly that it can be `heard` from space in the form of oscillations of the Earth`s gravity field.

The Caribbean Sea is a part of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Gulf of Mexico. It is a bounded by South America, Central America and the Caribbean islands, and covers an area of approximately 2,754,000 km2 (1,063,000 square miles).

Map showing the area of the Caribbean Sea

Map showing the area of the Caribbean Sea (Wikimedia Commons)

Researchers analysed the sea levels and pressure readings taken from the bottom of the Sea using four different models of ocean activity in the Sea over the period 1958 up to 2013 as well as using information from tide gauges and satellite measurements of gravity.

They noticed a phenomenon which they have called a `Rossby Whistle` which happens when a Rossby wave -- a large wave which propagates slowly to the west in the ocean -- interacts with the seafloor.

A Rossby wave interacting with the sea floor

People light candles during a candlelight vigil for the victims of EgyptAir flight 804, at the Cairo Opera house in Cairo, Egypt May 26, 2016. REUTERS/MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY

People light candles during a candlelight vigil for the victims of EgyptAir flight 804, at the Cairo Opera house in Cairo, Egypt May 26, 2016.
REUTERS/MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY

Egyptian Prime Minister Sherif Ismail issued a decision on Thursday officially declaring the passengers of EgyptAir flight MS804 deceased.

The decision comes days after EgyptAir announced that it has come to an agreement with insurance companies to compensate families of passengers US 25,000 while investigations are on-going as to the cause of the crash.

Last week, the flight recorders of flight MS804 were discovered partly damaged in the Mediterranean Sea by a search vessel. The black boxes are currently being examined by Egyptian investigators who are set to decide whether they will be sent abroad for repairs.

The cockpit voice recorder allows investigators to hear what the pilot and co-pilot were saying in the moments before the airplane crashed, and should include any background noise.

Meanwhile, the second black box, containing the flight data recorder, will provide additional data that may allow investigators to determine the cause of the crash.

Flight MS804 vanished at 2:30AM Cairo time on May 19. The passenger plane was carrying 66 people from Paris to Cairo and ”vanished” moments after entering Egyptian airspace. Terrorism and mechanical failure are among the possibilities being explored by the investigative committee.

Egyptians carry their belongings as they transit the Sallum border crossing with Libya on February 23, 2011. Photo: Tarek Elframawy

Egyptians carry their belongings as they transit the Sallum border crossing with Libya on February 23, 2011. Photo: Tarek Elframawy

Egypt’s foreign ministry said on Wednesday that it signed a memorandum of understanding with the United Nation’s World Food Program regarding emergency aid worth US 2.8 million for thousands of Egyptian returnees from Libya.

In a statement published on state-owned MENA, the ministry said that the project would enable returnees from Libya to receive monthly food vouchers worth 39 per person over three months, reaching a total amount of 2.8 million.

The aid will be delivered to around 60,000 individuals who have returned from Libya and are registered with the ministry of manpower, according to the statement.

The delivery of aid will start in Sohag and Qena provinces as they have received the largest number of returnees, Assistant to the Foreign Minister Ambassador Hisham Badr said. Aid will later be distributed in Minya, Assiut and Kafr el-Sheikh.

Thousands of Egyptians have been forced to leave their jobs and return to Egypt amid a turbulent environment of armed conflict in Libya.

Violence has intensified in Libya particularly since 2014, when conflicting parties sought to take control of the country.

Accordingly, Egypt has warned against travel to Libyan territories and called for Egyptians living in Libya to exercise extreme caution.

According to the World Food Program (WFP), most returnees originate from the “economically stressed” region of Upper Egypt and have no means of subsistence. They also face the challenge of finding employment.

Therefore, WFP believes that there is “an immediate need to support vulnerable and food-insecure Egyptian returnees in a context of rising food prices and an already overstretched social and economic system.”

This content is by Aswat Masriya

gty_donald_trump_announcement_jc_150630_16x9_992

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump criticized the U.S. government’s decision to support protests against then-President Hosni Mubarak in what later became known as the 25 January Revolution.

Speaking on foreign policy in a speech in New York, Donald Trump said that Hillary Clinton, who was then Secretary of State under Obama’s Presidency, had opened “Pandora’s box for radical Islam” by supporting the ouster of a “friendly regime.”

“[Hillary Clinton] helped force out a friendly regime in Egypt and replace it with the radical Muslim Brotherhood,” said Trump during his speech.

“The Egyptian military has retaken control, but Clinton has opened the Pandora’s box of radical Islam.”

The comments, which appear to support Egypt’s current government under President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, a former military general, have been met with mockery on social media. Social media users have widely circulated a 2011 interview with Trump where he strongly criticized a “corrupt” Hosni Mubarak.

“If you take look at Egypt — I’m not blaming anything or anybody for Egypt — although I would like to know how a man worth 70 billion that’s working as head of a country,” said Trump in an interview with FOX where he criticized the U.S. government for not acting earlier to support an ouster of the Mubarak regime.

Other social media users have pointed to the fact that Hillary Clinton has been vocal about her lack of support of the 25 January Revolution.

“I cautioned about the overthrow of [former President Hosni] Mubarak, and now we’re back with basically an army dictatorship,” said Clinton in December 2015 during a live debate with her then-opponent Bernie Sanders.

The position of Clinton and Trump against the 25 January Revolution is echoed across congress, with several members of congress expressing their support for President Sisi as a staunch opponent of radical Islam.

Despite his comments on Egypt and other controversial statements relating to Muslims, Egypt has not released any statements concerning Trump or what its position would be if the U.S. elects Trump as President.

Got anything planned for Monday night? Grab your dauber and join a fun bunch of Thereians for Ultimate There BINGO! Weekly events are held on Monday’s at the There Party Barge in Comet and hosted by Susanszy. Meet new friends and win prizes!

bingo7

Join the Ultimate There BINGO club in There to receive group emails and event invites. You’ll need to create an account and register for the online BINGO game created by Percepti0n. It’s a good idea to be registered for the game ahead of time and ready to go when the first number is called. You can register your Ultimate There BINGO account here. Good luck to all of our players!

bingo12

 


Ancient Naval Base Discovered Underwater Near Athens

In 493 BC, Greek general and politician Themistocles urged Athens to build a naval force of 200 triremes as a bulwark against the Persians, who’d attacked and been repelled in 490 on land at the Battle of Marathon. Within three years, Persia unsuccessfully attacked Greece again, including by sea this time. So instead of the West being influenced by Persia, it remained under the sway of Greek religion and culture, including the democratic style of government that is purportedly the epitome of civilization.

The fortunes of the Greek navy waxed and waned over the centuries, but for nearly five centuries its main base was just outside Athens at Piraeus, which has been under exploration for 15 years.

This week, a Danish archaeologist heading the underwater archaeological expedition said that he has found the remnants of the ancient Athenian naval base in the city of Piraeus’s Mounichia and Zea harbors.

Dr. Bjørn Lovén of the Zea Harbor Project and University of Copenhagen, leading a group of Greek archaeologists, calls the ship-sheds and fortifications one of the ancient world’s largest structures. They were a key feature of Greece’s defenses and a base for offensives against its enemies around the length and breadth of the Mediterranean Sea for centuries.

Ship-sheds with a ship at bay in a drawing from the University of Copenhagen

Ship-sheds with a ship at bay in a drawing from the University of Copenhagen

Looking for some Friday night fun? Cross Country Racers (CCR) and BABS is hosting a Flamingo Fright Night CCR event that starts at 5:00 PM PT. Sign up for the racing event here. Let’s find out what has the flamingos flying off in a flurry!

Cross country racing in There is tons of fun! Explore the islands of There with friends and discover new locations. Sign up for the Cross Country Racing Club and keep up to date on future events.

flamingo


Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the Shipwreck while decompressing after a dive to 50 m (165 feet).

A team of researchers accomplished another impressive discovery during its ongoing excavation of the famous Antikythera Shipwreck. According to Huffington Post, over 60 priceless artifacts were pulled from the famous shipwreck during a recent expedition of the vessel. The ship sank in the Aegean Sea in approximately 65 BC.

The expedition of an international team led by the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) discovered outstanding gold jewelry, glassware, resin/incense, ceramic decanters, fragments of marble sculptures, and a spear from a statue. Exploration had been accomplished during the past few weeks. Moreover, the researchers discovered an extremely curious artifact, which seems to be an ancient weapon known as a dolphin. It was used to protect the massive ship against attacks from pirates. Moreover, the team reported, that they discovered a second ancient cargo ship close by the Antikythera vessel.

Ornate glassware, perfume jars and gold jewelry were recovered from the 2,000-year-old Antikythera shipwreck.

Ornate glassware, perfume jars and gold jewelry were recovered from the 2,000-year-old Antikythera shipwreck. Credit: Brett Seymour, EUA/WHOI/ARGO.

cardrock

Do you like to play Spades in There? The Cards Rock Club holds two Spades tournaments a week in the beautiful Ridge neighborhood on the island of Aurora.

The build at Cards Rock is a sight to see! Card players start the tournament at the bottom landing of Card Rock. Once a round of Spades has been played the winners progress up to another landing on the Rock to play the next round. Eventually players reach the top of the rock to play the final round.

If you like to enjoy a game of Spades, this is the place to be! If you like to play a game of cards with a little twist, then you won’t want to miss the next Cards Rock Event. Join the Club for a  fun tournament! OCD Spades is played to 100 points. Players must play their cards from left to right as they are shown on the playing panel. Players make their move with the card furthest to the left that is playable. Crazy! You’ve got to stay on your toes to play this game and win.

Join the Cards Rock Club to receive invites to crazy Spades tournaments.


The Bay Area Boat System (BABS) has an exciting event coming up on Saturday, June 25th called Get An Eyeful BABS Adventure! They are taking Thereians on a magical flight to view the newest BABS outpost tower in There! What’s an outpost you ask?

The BABS group supports a network of large landing towers and outposts throughout There. The towers allow big groups of guided hoverboat tours to easily island hop from one location to the next. BABS throws regular events and everyone is invited. You can pilot your own hoverboat or relax and enjoy the scenic view from the passenger seat.

Catch a flight with the best Boat Captains in There and enjoy a leisurely tour to the newest outpost tower this weekend!

h2hb8Ve


We’ve got you covered this summer for all of the hottest styles in swimwear! Whether you’re lounging by the pool with your sweetie or out at the beach with your bestie, your avatar will be looking fly in a one piece or itsy bitsy bikini from our Thereian Designers. Check out this season’s bathing suits for women currently in Auctions.

1043322851 1039816347   1038630705

1046674201 685669809 675715520

 


airport

Egypt’s National Falcon Company for Airport Security signed an airport security agreement with British Company Restrata for Consulting and Training, announced Egypt’s Civil Aviation Ministry on Tuesday.

According to Al-Ahram, citing the Civil Aviation Ministry, the agreement will see the training of 7,000 personnel in airport security procedures. A second agreement hired the British firm as a security consultant on airport security.

National Falcon is a joint venture for airport security between Falcon Group International and the Egyptian government.

The agreement was announced on the same day British Airways announced it would be indefinitely suspending all flights to Sharm El-Sheikh, despite earlier indications that flights would resume this September.

Egypt’s airport security has been under scrutiny since the crash of a Russian airliner in October 2015 which killed all 224 people on board. Egypt hired a British consulting firm to review airport security in December 2015, and has allocated US 32 million to the budget of airport security.

The continued suspension of flights to Egyptian cities, including by Russia, is greatly harmful to Egypt’s tourism industry which has been failing since the 2011 revolution. Approximately four million Egyptians work in the tourism sector, which accounts for 12.6 percent of the country’s total employment and about 12 percent of the economy.

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